Thursday, January 12, 2017

New DVD Chronicles Peter, Paul and Mary

Posted By on Thu, Jan 12, 2017 at 9:00 AM

Peter, Paul and Mary
  • Peter, Paul and Mary

Peter, Paul and Mary are mainly identified with the Greenwich Village folk scene of the early 1960s, but the trio has strong connections to our region as well. Besides having massive hits with their versions of tunes by famous locals Bob Dylan (“Blowin’ in the Wind,” “Too Much of Nothing”) and Pete Seeger (“If I Had a Hammer”), the three were managed by Bearsville music magnate Albert Grossman; member Peter Yarrow spent much of his childhood at his mother’s Woodstock cabin. A newly released DVD, 50 Years with Peter, Paul and Mary, explores the beloved threesome’s history and includes rare and previously unseen footage.

First aired on PBS, 50 Years with Peter, Paul and Mary was produced by four-time Emmy Award-winning director Jim Brown and follows the group from the hub of the folk revival in New York through the civil rights and antiwar era of the 1960s, their later advocacy and music, singer Mary Travers’s moving memorial, and finally to the present, where their legacy continues to inform and inspire.

Check out this brief trailer:

50 Years with Peter, Paul and Mary is out now on MVD Visual. For more information, visit www.peterpaulandmary.com.

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Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Peekskill's Daisy Jopling Unveils New Album

Posted By on Tue, Jan 10, 2017 at 9:00 AM

Daisy Jopling
  • Daisy Jopling

Now based in Peeksill, violinist Daisy Jopling originally hails from London, England, where she studied at the Royal College of Music before going on to other prestigious academies. In addition to touring the world with the creative string trio Trilogy and appearing on the Elton John-scored soundtrack to Disney’s The Road to El Dorado (2000), the boundary-busting Jopling has worked with jazz stars Joe Zawinul, Bobby McFerrin, and Wolfgang Muthspiel, as well as numerous non-Western musicians. This month, Awakening, the third solo album by the music educator and Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center veteran, was released.

The disc further explores Jopling’s previous classical/world music fusion efforts, combining her classical roots with elements of reggae, Celtic folk, rock, pop, jazz, funk, Latin, and other styles. In this 2014 clip, Jopling and her band perform a familiar classic rock staple:

Awakening is out now on the Fleur de Son Classics label. For more information, visit http://www.daisyjoplingband.com/.

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Monday, January 9, 2017

WinterFest at the Hudson Valley Rail Trail

Posted By on Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 9:00 AM

COURTESY OF THE HUDSON VALLEY RAIL TRAIL
  • Courtesy of the Hudson Valley Rail Trail

Chestnuts will be roasting, marshmallows will be toasting, and wagon drawn hayrides will be happening in Highland during the Hudson Valley Rail Trail’s 20th annual WinterFest. The family event brings together over twenty regional restaurants to present their best batches of chili and compete for the “Best of Fest” People’s Choice Award in both meat and vegetarian categories. With games like broom ball and bean bag toss, craft projects hosted in the heated Lowe’s Project Tent, and time to enjoy the snowy landscape of the Hudson Valley Rail Trail, the festival is great for kids and families.

The four-mile Hudson Valley Rail Trail includes a wetlands complex with Class A protected trout stream, views of Illinois Mountain, and an original 19th century rail bed. You can hike, bike, roller blade, cross-country ski, snow shoe, or horseback ride it. It was born when the rail bridge burned in a mysterious fire in the 1970s, and rail traffic was redirected. A right-of-way easement bought by technology companies for high speed internet in the 1990s paid for the beginning of the rail trail system, which is working to expand and connect with other trail systems and sporting trails. It’s supported by the Town of Lloyd and developed in part with funds from the Greenway Conservancy.

The Hudson Valley Rail Trail’s 20th Annual WinterFest at the Hudson Valley Rail Trail Depot at 101 New Paltz Road in Highland: Saturday January 14, 2017; 11 am to 2 pm; $2 per person, children ages six and under are free, and taste one chili for fifty cents or taste them all for $8. Additional food and beverages are available at the Hudson Valley Rail Trail Grille. Call 1-781-640-0881 for more info or visit their Facebook for updates.

The Hudson Valley Rail Trail Association, the non-profit organization dedicated to creating, maintaining, promoting and improving the Hudson Valley Rail Trail, sponsors a number of events throughout the year, and all proceeds go to trail maintenance, improvements, expansions, grant matching funds, and publicity.
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Thursday, January 5, 2017

Cooking Classes at Panzur Restaurant and Wine Bar

Posted By on Thu, Jan 5, 2017 at 10:00 AM

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If you’re looking to try out your hand at some experimentation in the kitchen for the new year, we’ve got news: Panzur in Tivoli has a lineup of cooking classes beginning this January. Enjoy a collaborative experience in creating a restaurant quality meal using seasonal, locally sourced products.

The day begins at 10am, as students arrive and get to know one another over coffee and tea. Cooking begins soon after. Don’t worry about being unleashed into the kitchen on your own, even those new to culinary creation. Owner Rei Peraza says that the menus and outlines for class are discussed before the cooking begins, and the experience is what you want to make of it.

“We really make this as interactive as possible and students are given every opportunity to be as hands on as they want to be,” Peraza explains.

What’s a cooking class without a little bit of sampling and snacking before eating the full meal? At 12:30pm, the culinary experimenters settle down for a break with snacks and wine. After another burst in the kitchen, it’s time to eat dinner.

There are two cooking class events each month in January, February, and March.

For those who want a jumpstart on the new year’s resolutions, on January 15 the class “Everyone (except Chefs) loves Brunch” will begin the year of cooking classes. This class, given its brunch theme, begins a bit earlier, at 9am.

Next up on the menu is a meal themed around French country fare, titled “Gascony,” on January 22.

Delicious food is only one part of the experience. Panzur is also interested in the community that working together to create a meal can bring. You may even want to sign up for another class.

“Getting a firsthand insight into the mind of a Chef, witnessing the skills it takes, then being in a working restaurant kitchen and having the chance to sit down together and enjoy a leisurely meal after a day spent in the kitchen is a unique way to connect, both for us and our customers,” Peraza continues.

Classes are $150, all inclusive. Partners, friends, and family can join for dinner for an additional $75. To reserve a spot in the class, call (845) 757-1071 or email Panzur. Panzur Restaurant and Wine Bar, 69 Broadway, Tivoli NY.

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Eastern European Folk Invades Kingston

Posted By on Thu, Jan 5, 2017 at 9:00 AM

Blato Zlato
  • Blato Zlato

Hudson Valley music fans know the winters here can be thin when it comes to the live stuff. Most touring bands are off the road until the spring, and even many local musicians use the season as a time to hole up and record or work on new tunes. But this folksy bill at BSP on January 12 would be a winner no matter what time of year it was booked: Blato Zlato, Sekanjabin, and G-String Orchestra.

Although Blato Zlato is tagged as “everyone’s favorite Turkish reggae band in the Hudson Valley” on the club’s website, to these ears that’s a bit misleading. The music I’ve checked out by the group is firmly in the Balkan string band tradition, and very well done—though if they are indeed experimenting with such Caribbean/Black Sea hybrids I’m certainly intrigued. A much bigger ensemble—twelve pieces to Blato Zlato’s usual six—Sekanjabin is based in New Paltz and similarly mines belly dance-friendly Middle Eastern and Eastern European forms, as does G-String Orchestra, who've been welcome performers at Mower’s flea market in Woodstock in years past.

Surrender here to Blato Zlato live in 2015:


Blato Zlato, Sekanjabin, and G-String Orchestra will perform at BSP in Kingston, New York, on January 12 at 8pm. A $10 donation is suggested. For more information, call (845) 481-5158 or visit http://bspkingston.com/.

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Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Rich Conaty (1954-2016)

Posted By on Tue, Jan 3, 2017 at 9:00 AM

Rich Conaty
  • F-Stop Fitzgerald
  • Rich Conaty

After a year filled with what seemed like almost daily deaths in the music and entertainment fields, last Friday came the similarly sad news of one more loss for 2016. Rich Conaty, a Hudson resident and for 45 years the host of New York-area radio program “The Big Broadcast,” passed away at the age of 63, a victim of cancer.

Rich’s show, heard mainly on WFUV for most its four-plus decades, was a haven for the jazz and pop music of the 1920s and 1930s. I admit I’d had a passing awareness of this music before I heard “The Big Broadcast,” but encountering the program literally changed my life. All it took for one to become a fan was to hear Rich’s show but once, so contagious was his unstoppable enthusiasm for the music. Suddenly the door into a whole universe of fun, beautiful music, which I came to understand and appreciate as the rock ’n’ roll of its day, was fully open. And, of course, the tunes themselves—the crème de la crème of the Great American Songbook—were great. It was fascinating to hear them interpreted variously via Rich’s deep, formidable collection of 78s. When he borrowed one of mine to include on one of his Big Broadcast compilation CDs, I was beyond proud.

Here’s a great short interview with Rich from 2014:

I consider myself lucky to have become friends with Rich, who came across on the air as one of the warmest, sweetest, most gregarious humans to ever live—and, as anyone else who ever met him will tell you, that’s exactly how he was away from the microphone as well. Never once did I see him in anything less than a happy mood. Lamentably, even though I lived in Hudson myself for five years, during that time Rich and I didn’t get to hang out as much as I would have liked. I’d occasionally see him behind the wheel of the stunning 1950 Nash Ambassador that was his pride and joy. But, as it happens when we let our existences consume us, life seemed to get in the way.

The last time I ran into Rich was just before I heard he was sick, when we were both on line at the post office and I was the midst of moving from one apartment to the next. I told him I was bummed I hadn’t had him over to see the old place. He shrugged it off, smiled, and said, “Well, I hope you took pictures.” I did, but he never got to see those either.

Rich, thank you for the pictures you left behind. The ones that have kept the great music of the past alive for so many years and will continue to do so by inspiring future generations to explore it. The song is ended, but the melody lingers on.

Here’s a link to the profile of Rich Conaty I wrote for the December 2006 issue of Chronogram:

http://www.chronogram.com/hudsonvalley/tales-of-the-jazz-age/Content?oid=2193238

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Monday, January 2, 2017

Sunday Children’s Series at the Hudson River Maritime Museum

Posted By on Mon, Jan 2, 2017 at 9:00 AM

ice_harvesting.jpeg

At its peak, the U.S. ice trade employed about 90,000 people, with supplies from the Hudson River going to feed New York City’s growing demand during the hot summers. But how was the industry able to keep harvested winter river ice from melting all year long? Families can find out, with a story and a science experiment, during the Hudson River Maritime Museum’s first Children’s Series program on Sunday, January 8th, at 1p.

The Hudson River Maritime Museum is located along the historic Rondout Creek waterfront in downtown Kingston. Established in 1980 as a collecting, research organization, it’s the only museum in New York State exclusively dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of the maritime history of the Hudson River, its tributaries, and related industries, like brick making, bluestone quarrying, cement making, coal transport, and crushed stone. They’ve got objects and archives galore, including photographs, ice yachts, ship models, life boats, and a 100-year-old shad boat. You can’t miss the historic steam tugboat Mathilda in the garden outside, but look around the back of the museum, too, for the maritime playground. Sharing knowledge and passion for maritime history through public events, lectures, education programs and activities, exhibitions, and publications, the HRMM also expanded in 2016 to include the Riverport Wooden Boat School, which offers a variety of drawing, carpentry, and boat building classes.

The children’s activity series will run every second Sunday of the month at 1p at the Hudson River Maritime Museum at 50 Rondout Landing in Kingston, offering a hands-on exploration of history, with snacks and hot cocoa included. Craft a sailor’s valentine from sea shells on February 12th; make scrimshaw from soap and learn about Hudson Valley whaling on March 12th; create a “micro-watershed” and learn about the Hudson River estuary on April 9th! It’s free for HRMM Household Membership holders (just $50 per year), or included with regular museum admission for non-members ($7 for adults; $5 for seniors and children 18 and under; free for kids 4 years and younger; and there’s also a family rate). Advance RSVP is requested. Email education@hrmm.org or call 845.331.0071 x.11. Day-of participants will be welcomed, space permitting. Ask about the HRMM’s education programs, field trips, and outreach programs on a variety of topics.

Don’t miss the HRMM’s fun kids’ page on their website!
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Thursday, December 29, 2016

Jeff "Siege" Siegel Celebrates New Album in Rosendale

Posted By on Thu, Dec 29, 2016 at 9:00 AM

Jeff Siege Siegel
  • Jeff "Siege" Siegel

Jeff “Siege” Siegel just might be the hardest-working jazz drummer in the Hudson Valley. He always seems to be playing somewhere in the region. And for much of last year he was hard at work not only on the stage but in the studio as well, crafting his quartet's new album King of Xhosa (Artist Recording Collective), whose arrival will be unveiled on January 17 and heralded with a record release show at the Rosendale Cafe on January 21.

Also a composer and music educator, Siegel has performed with Sir Roland Hanna, Ron Carter, Kenny Burrell, Jack DeJohnette, Benny Golson, Frank Foster, Sheila Jordan, Helen Merrill, Mose Allison, Dave Douglas, Lee Shaw, and numerous other jazz giants. King of Xhosa, the third album studio album by Siegel’s quartet, fuses straight-ahead post-bop with deeply spiritual South African stylings. Collaborating with the leader on the recording are South African trumpet master Feya Faku saxophonist Erica Lindsay, pianist Francesca Tanksley, bassist Rich Syracuse, and percussionist Fred Berryhill.

This clip from the session shows the recording of the track “Prayer”:

The Jeff “Siege” Siegel Quartet will perform at the Rosendale Cafe in Rosendale, New York, on January 21 at 8pm. For ticket price and more information, call (845) 658-9048 or visit http://rosendalecafe.com/.

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Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Pennings' 3rd Annual New Year's Eve Keg Drop

Posted By on Tue, Dec 27, 2016 at 9:00 AM

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Pennings Farm in Warwick is hosting their New Year’s Eve celebration… With a cylinder-shaped twist. From December 31st from 9pm to 1am, the bar will hold an evening of rip roaring celebration to ring in the new year (for a full list of celebrations, check out Chronogram's New Year's Eve Event Guide).

It may be a bit too chilly to go out and enjoy their 100-acre apple orchard, but the party will rock all night with live music by the Black Dirt Bandits. This band of brothers will play a mix of southern and classic rock, including covers from Brad Paisley, Florida Georgia Line, Johnny Cash, and some originals.

The Black Dirt Bandits
  • The Black Dirt Bandits

Hungry after dancing?The pub and grill will be serving a late night buffet of bar snacks to compliment Pennings’ selection of American craft beer, wine, and cider. A photo booth will be set up, and guests are encouraged to post their pictures on social media with the hashtag #penningsfarmnyekegdrop. Party accessories will be provided to guests for pictures.

This all leads up to the big event. The ball drop. Actually… The keg drop. Remember that cylinder-shaped twist? Pennings will have their countdown to the drop of a lit-up silver keg. Free champagne or hard cider, courtesy of the new Pennings Farm hard cidery, toast with the keg drop countdown.

Tickets are $15. For more info call (845) 986-1059 or visit their website. Pennings Farm Market, 161 South Route 94, Warwick.

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Alejandro Escovedo Brings All-Star Band to Hudson

Posted By on Tue, Dec 27, 2016 at 9:00 AM

Alejandro Escovedo
  • Alejandro Escovedo

Alejandro Escovedo’s visits to the region are always notable events, but his return to Club Helsinki on January 6 is extra worthy of your attention. Why? Well just check out the all-star band that’s accompanying him: The Minus 5, which includes Peter Buck of R.E.M., Scott McCaughey of the Young Fresh Fellows, Kurt Block of the Fastbacks, and Linda Pitmon of the Baseball Project.

Though born in and strongly identified his present home state of Texas, singer-songwriter Escovedo initially made his name on the West Coast in the late 1970s as the guitarist of San Francisco punk forbears the Nuns. He returned to the Lone Star state in 1981 to cofound cowpunk pioneers Rank and File, and next formed the similarly rootsy True Believers with his brother, Zeros guitarist Javier Escovedo (Alejandro and Javier are the uncles of singer/percussionist Shiela E; their older brothers, percussionists Pete and Coke Escovedo, played in Santana). Alejandro went solo in the early 1990s and, in and around a hepatitis-C scare that engendered a star-studded benefit album to assist with his steep medical bills, has been cultivating a deep catalog of acclaimed albums. (No Depression named him Artist of the Decade in the 1990s). His newest effort is 2016’s Burn Something Beautiful (Fantasy Records), which was co-produced by Buck and McCaughey.

Here’s Escovedo performing the Burn Something Beautiful track “Farewell to the Good Times”:

Alejandro Escovedo and the Burn Something Beautiful Band will appear at Club Helsinki in Hudson, New York, on January 6 at 9pm. The Minus 5 will open. Tickets are $25 and $30. For more information, call (518) 828-4000 or visit https://helsinkihudson.com/.

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