Daily Dose | Hudson Valley; Chronogram

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

RCS Fine Art presents Summerland

Posted By on Wed, Aug 13, 2014 at 9:00 AM

ELIZABETH MEYERSOHN
  • Elizabeth Meyersohn

For over twenty years, Elizabeth Meyersohn has drawn inspiration for her paintings from the landscapes around her studio in western Massachusetts. Her approach lies at the intersection of physical and perceived atmosphere and color, utilizing bright colors and stylized imagery to evoke the impressionist paintings from an earlier time. She is particularly interested in raking light and dramatic clouds. The work comes from both direct observation and photography.

Now until September 1 her work will be exhibited at a pop-up showroom inside Hurley Motorsports on U.S Rt 209, in an exhibition called Summerland, by arrangement with RCS Fine Art. RCS Fine Art is an art advisory firm that connects people with art. We research, select, frame, deliver and install artwork for homeowners, architects, interior designers, healthcare facilities, law firms, small businesses and corporations. Founded on he belief that the selection of art work and it's strategic placement in a space is a powerful means of expression and identity for businesses and individuals, RCS is establishing itself as a valuable partner for business looking to spruce up their venues, and artists eager to promote their work. To learn more check out the group's Facebook.

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Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Pianist Julia Dusman Performs in Ellenville

Posted By on Tue, Aug 12, 2014 at 9:00 AM

Julia Dusman
  • Julia Dusman

Music in Ellenville? I confess the first thing that comes to mind is pianist and famed producer John Simon’s long-standing jazz gig in the village, which is located in the extreme southwest corner of Ulster County. But there’s also MISU (AKA the Music Institute of Sullivan and Ulster counties; shouldn’t it be “MISUC”?), whose admirable mission “provides an opportunity for people of all ages to develop their varying levels of musical experiences in an environment that acknowledges and nurtures the whole person.” As that region is largely rural and underserved, such programming is desperately needed, so MISU has my undying applause. And, in line with the institute’s ongoing efforts, is an August 20 concert by pianist Julia Dusman, who will be accompanied by violist Anastasia Solberg.

A native of Russia, Dusman received her Bachelors Degree from the Moscow College of Music and Masters Degree from the Nizhny Novgorod State Conservatory. She continued her education at Mannes College of Music in New York, where she received a second Masters Degree and a Professional Studies diploma. She is the 1999 recipient of the Chamber Music Pedagogy Grant and the Newton Swift Piano Award and the 2002 winner of the New Triad Foundation Competition, and has appeared in such major venues as Russia’s Rachmaninoff Concert Hall, the Concert Hall of the Moscow Conservatory, and Carnegie Hall, where she made her solo debut in 2005.

Here she is that same year, in tandem with fellow pianist Michael Jon Spencer:
http://vimeo.com/12906712

Julia Dusman will perform with Anastasia Solberg at MISU in Ellenville, New York, on August 20 at 7:30pm. Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 at the door (students are $5; children under 12 are free). For more information, call (845) 647-5087 or visit http://misucatskills.org/.

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Sunday, August 10, 2014

"Rewire" Author Talk in Rhinebeck

Posted By on Sun, Aug 10, 2014 at 9:00 AM

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According to Richard O'Connor, PhD, you can teach on old dog new tricks. That's the gist of O'Connor's new book, Rewire: Change Your Brain to Break Bad Habits, Overcome Addictions, and Conquer Self-Destructive Behavior (Hudson Street Press, 2014).

O'Connor will visit Oblong Books in Rhinebeck at 4pm today to offer a discussion, Q&A, and book signing. Expect to hear a lot about the nature of our brains and why we do the things that we do - and what we can do to change the things that, well, just aren't working. O'Connor's book tells us how to tackle such road blocks as procrastination, overeating, chronic disorganization, and the like. The upshot is more peace of mind, health, and happiness.

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Saturday, August 9, 2014

"booksmart" opens at Matteawan Gallery

Posted By on Sat, Aug 9, 2014 at 9:00 AM

Björn Meyer-Ebrecht, Untitled (Siehe die Stadt, die leuchtet), 2012, found book cover mounted on museum board, 18 1/2 x 19 3/4 in.
  • Björn Meyer-Ebrecht, Untitled (Siehe die Stadt, die leuchtet), 2012, found book cover mounted on museum board, 18 1/2 x 19 3/4 in.

Librarians and book lovers will find a lot to like in Matteawan Gallery's new exhibition "booksmart," though it may be a bit of a shock at first to those who still appreciate the printed word. That's because the exhibit, featuring work by Theresa Gooby, Brece Honeycutt, Björn Meyer-Ebrecht, and August Ventimiglia, involves some mutilated and cutup book covers.

While the artists may not have always followed Library rules, they certainly meant no disrespect to the print medium. In this digital age, books seem to be increasingly replaced by content on phones and laptops, yet there remains something very enduring about a traditional book. They evoke memories , and carry all sorts of associations and meanings, both personal and cultural. Each of the artists in this exhibition uses books in very different ways; however, a sense of memory and reverence for the book as an object of knowledge and discovery underpins all of the works.

The books in Theresa Gooby’s wall sculptures are encased in wax and most of the covers have been removed, leaving the titles and authors anonymous. Brece Honeycutt makes her own books by dyeing paper with plants and other materials found around her studio in western Massachusetts. Sheets of paper are folded and interleaved with flowers, leaves, and metal pieces, then bundled and tied up with metal graters or clamped with binder clips. Bjorn Meyer-Ebrecht’s sculptures are composed of found architecture and art history books. In his book cover works, the pages of a book are removed, and the cover is cut into pieces, reassembled, and mounted flat on the wall. August Ventimiglia’s works are composed of the pages of books in which text has been underlined. Part collage and part drawing, the underlined passages are cut from the page but the text is left out. Each of the artists's work will be meaningful to anyone who has fond memories of books and reading. The exhibit runs until August 31, with an opening reception tonight at 6pm.

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Friday, August 8, 2014

Choreography on the Edge

Posted By on Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 9:00 AM

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Most think of ballet and Irish step as traditionally rigid forms of dance. But since 1985, the artists of Choreography on the Edge have been trying to change that and to push the boundaries of all types of movement. The event was conceived by a group of local choreographers who wanted to showcase some new pieces, the requirement being that they integrate music and movement in new and unusual ways. The public loved it, and Choreography on the Edge has returned every year since.

Its 25th program will be held on Friday, August 8 and Saturday, August 9 at 8pm, and on Sunday, August 10 at 3pm, at the historic Byrdcliffe Theater in Woodstock. Its choreographers and dancers will showcase a variety of styles and techniques: modern dance, contemporary ballet, and some creatively revamped Irish step. Audiences will see choreography by Joel Hanna, an original Riverdance cast member, as well as by local dancers Laura Ward of Octavia Cup Dance Theatre and Claire Jacob-Zysman. Leighann Kowalsky and Rowan Willigan, of the D’Amby Project, will also perform. And this year, Choreography on Edge cofounder Sara Miot will return after many years to present a piece performed by the Ulster Ballet.

The dance event requires both artists and audience members to challenge themselves and their expectations. In an effort to keep performances spontaneous and fresh, the show's curators did not preview works before adding them to the program—most will be premiered at Byrdcliffe. Tickets are $12 and available at ChoreographyontheEdge@gmail.com or (845) 453-8673.

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Thursday, August 7, 2014

Jazz Legend Reggie Workman Plays Hudson on Sunday

Posted By on Thu, Aug 7, 2014 at 9:00 AM

Reggie Workman
  • Reggie Workman

A vital member of the legendary John Coltrane Quartet, bassist Reggie Workman is nothing less than a jazz icon. This Sunday, Workman will join pianist Armen Donelian and saxophonist Marc Mommaas for a concert presented by Hudson Jazzworks at the historic Hudson Opera House.

Currently a professor at the New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music, the 77-year-old Workman played in groups led by Gigi Gryce, Red Garland, Roy Haynes, and Wayne Shorter before joining Coltrane’s quartet in 1961. After recording the seminal albums Africa/Brass, Ole Coltrane, Impressions, and Live at the Village Vanguard, Workman went on to play with Thelonious Monk, Pharoah Sanders, Herbie Mann, Yusef Lateef, Art Blakey, Archie Shepp, Lee Morgan, David Murray, Mal Waldron, and others.

Founded by Donelian and Mommaas in 2007, Hudson Jazzworks hosts an intensive jazz improvisation and composition workshop every August for four days and three nights, culminating with a concert at which the musicians are joined by workshop participants.

Here’s Workman in a sublime 1961 appearance by the Coltrane Quartet with special guest Eric Dolphy:

Reggie Workman, Armen Donelian, and Marc Mommaas will perform at the Hudson Opera House in Hudson on August 10 at 3:30pm. The concert will be preceded by a talk from the musicians at 3pm. Tickets are $10 ($8 for members; free to students and people 18 and under). For information, call (518) 822-1438 or visit www.hudsonoperahouse.org.

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Beyond the Tent at the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival

Posted By on Thu, Aug 7, 2014 at 9:00 AM

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The Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival is a beloved annual event, offering performances of some of the Bard’s greatest works in its open-air theater tent on the river. This year in its 28th season and celebrating the playwright’s 450th birthday, the festival has programmed “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “Othello,” “The Two Gentlemen of Verona,” and David Ives’s “The Liar.” But in addition to mainstage works, organizers makes a priority of showcasing some new plays in process.

HVSF2—formerly In Process—was added to the festival in 2011. It’s a small series of new plays read in a lab setting, giving audience members the opportunity to see how pieces are workshopped before being put onstage. This year, the program consists of four adaptations and original works for stage.

“Sense and Sensibility” is Kate Hamill’s new adaptation of the Jane Austen novel about two sisters, Marianne and Elinor, who are left to discover love, flirtation, and heartbreak with no dowries. It’s a story of prudence, unwavering passion, and the search for a balance of the two. The play will open the series on Friday, August 8 at 7pm.

Kenneth Cavander presents his modern transcription of Shakespeare’s “Timon of Athens,” the cautionary tale of a too-generous aristocrat, on Thursday, August 14 at 7pm.

Catch the reading of Michael Laurence’s new original play, “Hamlet in Bed,” on Thursday, August 16 at 7pm. The play’s main character is Michael, an actor whose two greatest desires are to play the part of Hamlet and to find his birth mother.

The series will close with “Dog in the Manger,” David Johnston’s adaptation of the play by Lope de Vega. The Spanish Golden Age drama defies its society’s classism with a story of forbidden love between a countess and her secretary. Friday, August 22 at 7pm.

All HVSF2 tickets are $25 and available for purchase online, and all readings will be held at the Philipstown Depot Theatre in Garrison.

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Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Harlem Valley Rail Trail to Get an Update

Posted By on Wed, Aug 6, 2014 at 9:00 AM

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Dutchess and Columbia County residents in the mood for a beautiful day outdoors need look no further than the Harlem Valley Rail Trail. Conceived in the mid-1980s and opened in 1996, the trail preserves the linear route of what was once the New York & Harlem Railroad, a line connecting Manhattan to Albany. The route offers almost 11 miles of paved path between the Wassaic Metro North Train Station and Millerton and four from Ancram to Copake Falls. The Harlem Valley Rail Trail Association (HVRTA), however, is working toward a dream: to create 46 miles of uninterrupted trail from Wassaic to Chatham.

The job hasn’t been easy; the association relies on the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, & Historic Preservation, the NYSDOT, and its local towns to cover the cost of expansion and maintenance. This cooperation, as well as donations and volunteering from local residents, has made the rail trail a beautiful Hudson Valley attraction. Progress has been slow, but locals will be excited to hear about some recent developments. In June, the Secretary of the Interior and Director of the National Parks Service announced that the Harlem Valley Rail Trail, along with 18 other hiking and bike trails, would be recognized as a national recreation trail. And earlier in the year, the NYS Office of Parks, Recreation, & Historic Preservation provided the association with a grant of $375, 584—half of its $751, 168 goal for a new paving project.

On Saturday, August 9, the HVRTA will host an open house from 5pm to 7pm at the Roeliff Jansen Community Library in Hillsdale. Attendees will hear about efforts to raise the remaining half of the budget to pave a 1.5-mile stretch of trail between Black Grocery Road to downtown Hillsdale, as well as what they can do to contribute. More information at (518) 789-9591.

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Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Instrument Maker Butler Plays Roxbury Gallery

Posted By on Tue, Aug 5, 2014 at 9:00 AM

Ken Butler
  • Ken Butler

Well, this is kinda different. Last month, the Orphic Gallery opened “Instrumental Desire: Strings Attached,” an exhibition of the quirky instruments made by artist and musician Ken Butler. This Saturday, the gallery will host a performance by Butler and an ensemble of musicians from New York’s downtown experimental scene using instruments from the exhibit and others of their own creation.

Butler’s hybrid musical instruments/sculptures are created primarily from “urban detritus” and are sonically shaped with cutting-edge sound-processing gear. His works have been featured in numerous exhibitions and performances throughout the US, Canada, and Europe, and on PBS, CNN, MTV, and NBC’s “The Tonight Show,” on which he played live.

Watch Butler as he demonstrates a few of his creations here:

Ken Butler’s All-Star Ensemble will perform at the Orphic Gallery in Roxbury, New York, on August 9 at 7pm. For more information, call (607) 326-6045 or visit www.orphicgallery.com.

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UCI Mountain Bike World Cup

Posted By on Tue, Aug 5, 2014 at 9:00 AM

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Most Hudson Valley locals know Windham as a fall-winter town. Tucked within the high peaks of the Catskill Mountains, the area is a hotspot for leaf peepers in autumn and avid skiers and riders during the snowy months. But many may be unaware of the town’s international summer attraction: the UCI Mountain Bike World Cup.

The Union Cycliste Internationale, the worldwide governing body of cycling based in Switzerland, organizes the yearly competition in a number of cities around the world. This summer, it’s already hit Australia, Germany, the Czech Republic, and Canada; after passing through Windham (the only world cup site in the US), it will move on to France.

The cup is an entertaining blend of international and small-town. It brings male and female athletes from all over the world to compete in events and training in downhill and cross-country bicycling. This year’s competition will also include opportunities for spectators to compete—the Ride the Plank Challenge, an attempt to bike across a pond on only inflatable tubes and wooden planks, and the Red Bull Berm Challenge, a one-on-one race between to steep berms. Visitors can enjoy an indoor and outdoor bicycle expo, a block party in the town of Windham, a DJ and laser lights show, and a race for kids.

Windham’s event is set apart from other cup races in that it is funded almost entirely by private donations and the resources of Windham Mountain. A truly local effort, it relies on the work and support of racing enthusiasts and volunteers to continue each year.

The UCI Mountain Bike World Cup will be held from Thursday, August 7 to Sunday, August 10 at Windham Mountain. VIP ticket packages are available for purchase online, and more information can be found at (518) 943-3223.

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Hudson Valley Events

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Kids Weekly Ceramic Class @ Kingston Ceramics Studio

Kids Weekly Ceramic Class

Thursdays, 5-6:30 p.m. Continues through March 30 — Kids will learn wheel throwing, hand building, and decorating techniques. It will...
Beginner-Friendly Meditation Class @ Kadampa Meditation Center New York

Beginner-Friendly Meditation Class

Thursdays, 7-8:30 p.m. Continues through Dec. 19 — Join us every Thursday for a beginner friendly meditation class. Learn practical...

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