Dining & Drinking in the Hudson Valley

Food & Drink

The Hudson Valley is one of the most important and dynamic culinary regions in the country. Once considered the breadbasket of America during the Revolutionary War, the Hudson Valley’s deep agricultural roots and distinctive tenor contribute to the region’s locally sourced food ethos. Hudson Valley restaurants offer local ingredients, like fresh produce and grass-fed beef, and farms provide sustainable food throughout the region through farmers’ markets and CSA’s.

 

Growing Educated Eating Throughout the Hudson Valley with Glynwood

Despite being best known for their farmer training programs, CSA organic produce, and farming and food advocacy, the Glynwood Center for Regional Food and Farming is also deeply committed to finding ways to give non-professionals—your everyday Hudson Valley residents, foodies, and visitors—a fun, free, and educational glimpse at farm life.

Tags: Farms & CSA

Celebrate Cooperative Ownership and a Grand Opening with the Berkshire Food Co-op

To celebrate their grand opening at their new location, the Berkshire Food Co-op is throwing a major community party. The Co-op (including a number of its 3,500 member-owners) will cut the ribbon on their sleek and spacious new digs in Great Barrington.

Tags: Market

Maya Kaimal's Easy Indian Line Grows with Seasoned Rice Offerings

Rhinebeck resident and national foodie idol Maya Kaimal expands her line of South Indian sauces and dals for home chefs with the addition of seasoned rice options.

Tags: Recipes

Tuthilltown Spirits on the Rise

Tuthilltown Spirits Distillery in Gardiner is recognized for its quality nationally and plans to expand and unroll new flavors soon.

Tags: Craft Beverage Industry

The Real Scoop: Hudson Valley's Artisanal Ice Cream Makers

A mouthwatering look at the Hudson Valley’s growing artisanal ice cream movement.

Tags: General Food & Drink

Cocktail Recipe: Mary’s Lemon Phosphate

A Tart Summery Drink from Crown Lounge
At Crown, this light, tart cocktail balances earthy green tea with citrus and Japanese gin.

Tags: Recipes

Beer from the Ground Up at Arrowood Farm Brewery

Cofounders Blake Arrowood and Jacob Meglio create a brewery experience tailored to the Hudson Valley way of life with a sustainable model in agriculture.

Tags: Bars

Locavores Rejoice! Henry's at the Farm Offers a Menu of Mindful Meals

Henry's at the Farm, the restaurant located on the grounds of Buttermilk Farm Inn + Spa, offers up casual, American cuisine and craft beverages with locavore, farm-to-table sensibilities.

Tags: Restaurants

Drinking's a Hoot at the Yard Owl Brewery in Gardiner

You would be wise to check out the tasty new line of drinks from Yard Owl Craft Brewery, a brewpub based out of Gardiner, NY. When he isn't in making coffee at the Mud Puddle in New Paltz, NY, co-founder James Walsh is perfecting his line of Belgian-style beers on the side. Along with his partner, Kristop Brown, the duo pays homage to the old-world style by creating crowd-pleasing beers with an emphasis on simplicity and taste.This company has been turning heads since 2012 and the brew-duo aims to launch their canned series in June.

Tags: Craft Beverage Industry

Kingston Standard Brewing Co. Brings Oysters & German-Style Beer to Midtown

The Kingston Standard Brewing Co. aims to bring local folks together in a community-oriented space to drink and enjoy each others' company. The company strays from the popular IPA driven mission of most breweries, and instead provides light, drinkable beer and fresh, succulent oysters to foster a satisfying night out. While they primarily produce traditional Ales and Lagers, they also craft mixed fermentation style beers, including lambics and Flemish reds. However, this recently opened brewery is ever-expanding its drink list, so repeat customers will see more options arise in the future and can enjoy local wine and cider options available in the meantime.

Tags: Craft Beverage Industry

Fresh As It Gets: Berkshire Co-op Celebrates its Fourth Expansion

The Berkshire Food Cooperative, which began in 1981 as a buying club of Great Barrington families, now does $8 million in annual sales with over 3,500 member-owners and about 60 employees. The co-op is preparing to move into a new custom-built location, with twice as much space for more organic produce, meat, dairy, seafood, fresh flowers, and bulk foods along with a comfier, bigger cafe.

Tags: Farms & CSA

Lola's Cafe in New Paltz Offers Locally Sourced Catering

Chef Ed Kowalski founded Lola’s in Poughkeepsie in 2005, as a casual, health-supportive alternative to fast food restaurants. In 2017, he opened a second location in New Paltz that serves up Lola's signature sandwiches, salads, bowls, and homemade soups, plus offers full service catering.

Tags: General Food & Drink

Alleyway Ice Cream: A Pocket-Sized Ice Cream Parlor in Saugerties

In 2017, down a small, nondescript alley off Partition Street in Saugerties, Julian Hom opened a shoebox artisanal ice cream shop aptly named Alleyway. Made four quarts at a time using local milk from Hudson Valley Fresh, Alleyway Ice Cream offers about six flavors a week.

Tags: General Food & Drink

Nine Cakes Opens a Boutique Outpost in Hudson

Ah, cake...the food of celebration and romance and memory-making. If you’re planning to mark a milestone or special occasion with a gathering, the perfect cake is probably part of the vision, and there’s nothing like a slice of superior cake to turn even a random moment tasty. Nine Cakes, a boutique cake studio that’s won over Brooklyn and the wedding world in the since opening in 2008, is opening an outpost in Hudson, NY to serve the blossoming upstate wedding industry and to mark milestones in the everyday lives of local residents. Today, Friday, May 10,  master pastry chef Betsy Thorleifson will celebrate the grand opening of her Warren Street storefront, and everyone is invited to stop in for a cup of fresh coffee and a sample of the artful tiered cakes. Thorleifson's tiered, custom cakes are made from scratch. Her baking alchemy transforms fresh, simple ingredients (butter, sugar, flour, eggs, and cream) into majestic works of edible art, that reflect the personality of the customer from flavor profile to visual aesthetic. The designs range from whimsical to understated elegance to romantic floral opulence. In her own words, Thorleifson is "always striving for a handcrafted look, with an eye for detail and well-balanced composition." Thorleifson is known for the creativity of her process as well as the quality of her product. Her recipe for an occasion cake starts at least three months ahead of time when customers choose the flavors of cake and filling they'd like to sample from a lengthy menu, including special seasonal pairings. Next is a by-appointment consultation and tasting session, at which customers will be asked about your vision and shown mouthwatering pictures. (Customers are welcome to bring along any inspiration images to will help to zero in on the vision.) Nine Cakes uses the freshest all-natural ingredients to create moist, light, and not-too-sweet layers and airy Italian meringue buttercream to interpret your vision and create a cake that will exceed your expectations. Want proof? It’s in the tasting. You can try a slice with your fresh coffee—or grab a whole cake for tonight's dessert, if you get there early enough. The new Nine Cakes can be found in Hudson at 748 Warren Street; they’re open Friday through Sunday, 9am-5pm....

Tags: General Food & Drink

Early Terrible Wine Bar Embodies the New Wave of Woodstock

A black sign on Woodstock’s Mill Hill Road features the words Early Terrible scrawled in white handwriting. The peculiar post leads to a downhill path that brings you to the village’s newest hideaway. Early Terrible Wine Bar aims to pique your curiosity before you even darken its doorstep. “The name is supposed to be thought-provoking, to make you question what it means,” co-owner Gray Ballinger explains. “The sign draws you in, and the path leads you toward something to discover. It’s part of the experience we wanted to create.” At Early Terrible you won’t find another homage to hippie culture—don’t expect references to Jimi, or Cripple Creek, or that famed festival that happened 90 minutes away. The goal was to create something entirely different. “When we designed the wine bar, we wanted to bring out the essence of Woodstock’s woody, earthy environment,” Ballinger says. “So we created a place focused on quality food and drink, with decor tied to the spirit of its locale.” Open since January, Early Terrible exudes a moody, rustic ambiance with low lighting, exposed plank ceilings, unpolished antique windows, and other notions of time and place positioned around the room. Even your bill arrives tucked into a vintage book. Vintage saws cover one wall, and a sprawling root structure (excavated from Ballinger’s property and delivered on a flatbed) makes a beautiful, eccentric statement piece behind the bar. “We’re putting our spin on Woodstock,” Ballinger explains. “The building used to be a typical office space, so if you get the sense of being in a rustic barn, it’s because we built it that way.” Plans are underway to expand to a second location in Beacon in about a year, where they will tie decor to the city’s riverfront. Ballinger is no stranger to innovative nightlife, having worked at Manhattan’s famed Webster Hall and with family in the entertainment-design industry. He moved to Chatham three years ago where he helped open The People’s Pub, a gastropub with quality offerings at a spectrum of prices—a concept translated to Early Terrible’s menus. A succinct wine list offers reds, whites, and rosés from the West Coast and Europe. Only a handful are available by the glass ($9-$12), and bottles range from $30-$100, with some high-end exceptions (as of publication, a 2015 Sine Qua Non Grenache runs $720, for those who wish to truly indulge). There’s a variety of Champagnes ($9-$15 a glass, $70-$550 per bottle); a cocktail selection consisting of standards—Greyhound, Manhattan, Moscow Mule, and the like; and a few revolving craft beers. A short menu of tapas includes Baked Avocado a Diavolo, halved avocado stuffed with lentil paté and topped with sunflower seeds, tamari ponzu, hot smoked paprika, and chili oil ($10) and the artfully plated New York Fromage á Trois, a cheese plate with fruit and savory bites ($12), among other noshes. “Our guests are sophisticated; they know what they want. That’s why we emphasize quality over quantity,” Ballinger says. “We want to appeal to the person who is looking for an experience and who appreciates classics. Those that have endured have done so for a reason.” ...

Tags: Bars

Hit a Mother's Day Home Run with Pastries from The Bakery

Whether you’re a spouse or child, breakfast in bed is a time-honored, fool-proof way to kick off Mother’s Day with a bang. Plan ahead and do your pastry shopping at The Bakery in New Paltz, which offers a wide array of scrumptious baked goods from sticky, finger-licking cinnamon buns to fluffy, golden croissants, muffins, doughnuts, and danish.

Tags: General Food & Drink

WM Farmer & Sons' Prescription Julep Recipe

In honor of spring and the Kentucky Derby, WM Farmer & Son’s julep variation of choice.

Tags: Recipes

The State of the Hudson Valley Craft Beer Industry

From beer to spirits and wine, all sectors of the Hudson Valley’s craft beverage industry are growing at unprecedented rates.

Tags: Craft Beverage Industry

High Spirits: The State of the Hudson Valley Craft Distilling Industry

An estimated 40 craft distilleries will be in operation in the region by year's end (of the 180 in New York). Like the now-explosive beer industry, craft distilling started out tentatively, at times below the radar, but quickly found a fan base.

Tags: Craft Beverage Industry

The Hudson Valley's Wine Industry Reaches Critical Mass

While the Hudson Valley’s robust craft beverage scene may seem like a new phenomenon, this fertile region is actually home to America’s oldest winery and its oldest vineyard. In the past few years, local beer and spirits may have overshadowed wine, but the Hudson Valley vintners paved the way for so many others and their work is finally gaining recognition.

Tags: Craft Beverage Industry

Wilde Beest in Kingston Charges Headlong Into a New Chapter

A few weeks ago, Turgeon and his team crossed a major conceptual threshold when they rolled out their early spring menu, the first of six seasonal menus planned for the year. While the fundamental layout is unchanged (six small plates, six large plates, 4 desserts), nearly everything else has evolved.

Tags: Restaurants

Taste the Colors of the Craft Beverage Rainbow at the +MicroSymposium at BSP on 5/1

On Wednesday, May 1, experts in wine, spirits, cider, and craft beer industries will be taking over BSP Kingston for a jam-packed day of events and tastings. The +MicroSymposium will take place in BSP’s historic Spiegeltent, where mixologists, fermenters, foragers, brewers, distillers, and storytellers will pour and perform as they explain their science and craft. If you’ve got a favorite brand, chances are they’ll be on the extensive list of presenters, which include Abandoned Cider, Sly Fox Brewing Company, Chateau Du Coing, and GuS Soda. The events start at 11am, kicking off with the Brewery Ommegang, where brewmaster Phil Leinhart will discuss how Belgian arrived and exploded in Cooperstown. There are plenty of other informative and exciting events, like discussions about the creation of the first Farm Cidery in the Catskills, a wine/beer duel, and a closing jam session with the founder of Founders Brewing Co. Organized by family owned beverage distributor Gasko & Meyer, the event is trade only and not open to the general public, so if you are a writer, blogger, or photographer specializing in food and drink, snag your press passes now to interview one of these specialized brands. Interviews are conducted by appointment only, +MicroSymposium requires an RSVP....

Tags: General Food & Drink

Hudson Taco Brings Mexican Street Food to Newburgh

Newburgh’s revitalization period has arrived—and it comes bearing tacos. Located on Warburton Avenue, Hudson Taco is one of many new businesses springing up in Newburgh as creative sand investors have begun taking note of the waterfront city’s tide of revitalization. Nick Citera and Nicolas DiBrizzi (of Cosimo’s Restaurant Group) repaired and remodeled the crumbling West Shore Railroad Station, an architectural gem in Newburgh created by the designers of the railroad’s more popular sibling, the Grand Central Station. The newly restored train station now houses the Pizza Shop and Hudson Taco, a well-appointed Mexican-fusion restaurant and bar serving up delicious plates. From the outside, Hudson Taco is impressive, with a 60-foot enclosed patio and panoramic views of the Hudson River and highlands. Nano doors keep customers warm without sacrificing the beautiful view. The interior houses a modern, industrial ambience with exposed brick walls, hanging lamps that cast a warm glow, and metal-framed prismic chandeliers. Customers can choose to sit by the intimate bar or snag a seat by the windows in a booth or table. The intimate-yet-chic design makes Hudson Taco a perfect place for family taco night or a romantic date for two. Manager Dwayne Brant describes the restaurant as a “social gathering dining experience.” When the customer wants to order, they wave a card in the air, which signals the waiter. The food comes out as soon as it’s fresh and ready, tapas-style. When it comes to menu options, the Hudson Taco does not cut corners. The Hudson Taco, aims to put a spin on a longstanding favorite, “We wanted to come up with new concepts on Mexican street food, and keep everything locally sourced from all the farms in the area,” says Bryant. With more than a dozen taco options, there is something for everyone, including pork carnitas, mushroom and shishito pepper, baja fish, and Korean BBQ short rib. If you want to make it a meal, add some steak and shishito nachos, some of abuela’s chicken soup, or a charred corn salad. Hudson Taco offers an array of appetizers, bowls, and sides if you’re looking to explore more than just their taco territory. Satisfy your sweet tooth with a churro and some chocolate dip or fried Hudson Valley apple pie. If you’re looking for a more adventurous flavor profile, opt for the Mexican spiced brownie or the lemon jalapeno jar. And of course, tacos taste better with a few drinks! Hudson Taco spices things up with cocktails like Kiss and Fire (white rum, lime, jalapeno, and watermelon) and a wide selection of blanco and resposado tequilas. From the menu to the atmosphere, Hudson Taco is quickly becoming a community favorite. “We’ve been exceeding expectations,” Bryant says. “We are trying to bring this to the next level and create a high-end taqueria.” ...

Tags: General Food & Drink

The Rhinebeck Restaurant Scene Heats Up with Bia

Chef Rich Reeve's Irish Fusion Restaurant is Slated to Open Early June
One of the most eagerly awaited restaurant launches of the year is imminent: In early June, Chef Rich Reeve, formerly of Elephant in Kingston, and owner Kyle Kelley’s will throw open the doors to Bia, an Irish-fusion outpost located in the former Puccini space in Rhinebeck.

Tags: Restaurants

Hudson Valley EATS Debuts Its Birthday Club

Hudson Valley EATS, which is quickly becoming the ultimate online guide to where to dine and drink in the area. The website is divided into four sections—articles, events, news, and a searchable restaurant directory. Hudson Valley EATS offers one of the most detailed and refined search engines in the area for picking just the right place to dine, customizable to meet any diner’s needs and desires.

Tags: General Food & Drink

Easter Brunch in the Hudson Valley: Hop Over to a Splendid Spread

Ah, the loveliness of Easter. Renewal. Rebirth. Lamb, glazed ham, and fresh-made pastry. If you don’t feel up for cooking a big feast but you’d still like to partake, head to any of these fine Hudson Valley establishments for an extra-special Sunday brunch.

Tags: Culinary Events

Hudson Valley Malt Makes Grain-to-Glass Local Brews A Reality

One of the major turning points in the Hudson Valley craft beverage surge took place in 2015, when husband and wife Dennis Nesel and Jeanette Spaeth opened Hudson Valley Malt, paving the way for truly local grain-to-glass production.

Tags: Craft Beverage Industry

Blooming Hill Farm Celebrates 45 Years of Organic Growth

Love fresh, local, and organic? When you visit Blooming Hill Farm, you’ll be getting a glimpse of where this whole Hudson Valley locavore thing got started—or rediscovered, as farmer Guy Jones might prefer. He’s fond of pointing out that not so long ago, organic and local was just the normal way people grew and ate their food. And his own farm operation in Monroe has grown as organically as one of its own fruit trees. Jones was a lawyer with a storefront law office in Albany in 1980 when he realized that what he really wanted to do was grow food. He ventured west to Ithaca to get some dirt under his fingernails and learn the trade then started a farm of his own 60 miles from Manhattan. One imagines he may have heard “you’re going to do what?” more than once. In his early ventures to Union Square Greenmarket, Jones found that his eclectic taste in crops and foraged foods—there are over 200 varieties of produce grown at Blooming Hill today—was winning him regulars among ambitious young chefs such as David Bouley, Mario Batali, Tom Colicchio, and Michael Romano. Word spread, like a root system, and soon Jones was taking special requests, experimenting with imported seedstock, and delivering wholesale orders to New York restaurants. The family added a retail store, selling the farm’s fresh produce and flowers alongside the wares of other local growers and makers. Then came the cafe, an outpost for clean, simple farm-to-table fare, because after all, if you go to a farm you’re going to want to sit for a bit, and all that beautiful produce just begs to be prepared and elevated. Then came the monthly on-farm vegetarian dinners prepared by culinary luminaries, a natural outcropping of chefs’ appreciation for Blooming Hill’s food and farm. And of course, when people enjoy a gorgeous dinner on an enchanting farm, sooner or later someone’s going to want to get married there. Blooming Hill's 100-acre property has rolling hills, streams, and expansive fields of produce. Wedding rentals include the choice of any ceremony space on the campus, full use of all their buildings, and event planning services. Blooming Hill Farm frames food as a focal piece of the event, featuring farm-fresh ingredients of the season. Their catering service is complete with a two part, organically-sourced menu and a customizable beverage package. Adorned with rustic yet elegant amenities, the farm offers a magical and delightful destination for weddings. Today’s Blooming Hill Farm currently caters some 40 events a year on-premises while operating a massive community supported agriculture (CSA) operation and supplying dozens of  restaurants in Manhattan, Brooklyn, New Jersey, and the Hudson Valley. An on-farm restaurant has been offering brunch, lunch and dinner on weekends since 2015. Jones’ oldest son Travis and middle son Austin are both in the family business. Both don many hats, although Travis is more focused on growing and Austin on cooking. It’s a big operation with a lot of moving parts, but the heart of it has never changed. “Guy was one of the first farmers to actually grow organic to order for the New York restaurants, and the whole operation is very produce-forward,” says Caitlin Cullen, the newest member of the management team, happily back in her native Hudson Valley after soaking up foodie culture in New Orleans and Manhattan. “Organic drives everything we do.” At Blooming Hill’s Spring Artisan Fair on April 27, 10am-2pm, you’ll be able to soak up the farm’s ambience while enjoying live music and the wares of Blooming Hill’s circle of ceramicists, clothing designers, fabric artists, jewelers, painters and candle makers. And you can enjoy the next vegetarian on-farm dinner on May 4: cocktail hour, wood-fired pizza, and four exquisite courses. Or, of course, you can come enjoy the restaurant, cafe and market all season long. ...

Tags: Farms & CSA

Farm-to-Table Chinese Food at Lucky Dragon Restaurant in Rhinebeck

Lucky Dragon, which had its grand opening last night, Thursday, April 11, is a celebration of classic Chinese restaurant fare and of the Hudson Valley’s bounty. Like Cinnamon before it, this “farm-to-chopsticks” restaurant in Rhinebeck broadens the scope of farm-to-table into ethnic cuisine.

Tags: Restaurants

Go Fish: Two Hudson Valley Businesses Producing Ethical Seafood

Indoor recirculating aquaculture systems resolve the heavy resource draw and sustainability issues associated with other kinds of fish farming, leaving only the tasty harvest. Whether you’re looking to saute, grill, or bake at home, or find a restaurant whose seafood dishes you’ll love, ECO Shrimp in Newburgh and the Hudson Valley Fish Farm provide the real thing, and shopping with them supports the research that will fix the problem and feed the planet.

Tags: General Food & Drink

Mead: The Oldest & Latest Trend in Craft Beverage

Slate Point in Dutchess County Leads the Local Mead Industry
With a more than 7,000-year legacy, mead, a fermented beverage made from honey, is likely humanity's original alcoholic drink. The golden-hued elixir is coming back around for a victory run, with the ancient art form meeting cutting edge of craft beverage expertise. Like cider before it, mead is way different than what you thought. Get ready for your new favorite drink.

Tags: Craft Beverage Industry

New Paltz's Iconic Gilded Otter Bought by Middletown-Based Brewery Clemson Bros.

After 20 years, the iconic Gilded Otter in New Paltz sells to Middletown-based brewery Clemson Bros., who will keep many of the same menu items and traditions, while also introducing new flair to the beer list.

Tags: Bars

Whitecliff Vineyard: Come for the View, Stay for the Wine

This Pioneering Gardiner Wine-Maker Celebrates 20 Years
In the fall of 1998, long before the Hudson Valley was national craft beverage mecca, before the words “Napa of the East” had ever been uttered, husband and wife Michael Migliore and Yancey Stanforth-Migliore produced their first vintage on the nascent Whitecliff Vineyard in Gardiner. This year, the Migliore family celebrates 20 years in the Hudson Valley wine-making business. “We are still going strong, an accomplishment we are proud of in a challenging farm-based business,” Yancey says. Originally intended as Michael’s retirement plan after a career in engineering at IBM, the vineyard quickly turned into an obsession. Raised in the Bronx, Michael grew up with European grandparents who made wine in their basements, and was eager to see what flavors he could coax from the fertile land of a former dairy farm. He began planting small amounts of different varieties to test what would work well in this Northeastern climate. In July ’99, the tasting room opened to the public, boasting homemade wine and epic views of the Shawangunk Ridge. Over the years the operation has grown steadily. Twenty-six of the 70 acres in Gardiner are planted with grape varieties, and they recently planted six acres at a new riverside property in Hudson, where they are also opening a second tasting room. Whitecliff has been an essential pioneer of the Hudson Valley wine industry, earning global recognition for their vintages. In 2018, they started and ended the year with a bang, earning double gold for estate wines at both the Finger Lakes International Wine Competition (Gamay Noir) and at San Francisco International Wine Competition (Cabernet Franc). Yancey says candidly, “I’ve had customers tell me, ‘I came for the view, but I stayed for the wine.’” Gold Standard Tastings “Over the years, we’ve seen a lot of changes in how people approach and enjoy our wine tastings,” Yancey says. “More groups, bachelorette parties. It’s not just a quick taste—people are looking for an experience.” In response to the changing demand, in addition to their standard tasting flights, Whitecliff has developed the Gold Tasting. These private, seated tastings feature a guided sampling of eight of Whitecliff’s 30 wines, chosen in discussion with the guests; cheese and crackers; and a tour of the winery. Through an in-depth conversation, participants learn about the wines themselves and the art of tasting, while developing a keener sense of their own preferences. “People can easily be intimidated by wine. But the only thing that matters is a good sense of what you like and how to ask for it,” Yancey says. “People have said to me, ‘I’ve toured in Napa and learned more in 20 minutes here.' We really enjoy the educational aspect.” Gold tastings are $35-40 a person, depending on group size, and only by reservation. Call (845) 255-4613 to reserve. Whitecliff Wine Club Another way to develop an in-depth appreciation of the full range of Whitecliff’s award-winning wines is to join their wine club. Unlike other oenophile memberships, this one is free to join, flexible, and you get to choose all your wines. Whether you sign up for the half-case or full-case club, you buy twice a year in February and August, plus you receive discounts on wine purchases and free tastings all year round. It’s like having a savings card for your local supermarket. Members can either pick up at the tasting room or get their bottles delivered by mail. They also get to participate in exclusive events all year round, like an education wine blending seminar. Visiting the Vineyard While the Gold Tasting and the Wine Club allow you to cultivate a deep familiarity with Whitecliff's vintages, anyone can stop by the tasting room during opening hours for a spur-of-the-moment taste. “In a way, the blooming of the craft beer and spirits industries has distracted from Hudson Valley wines, but the quality of the wine is there,” Yancey says. “When people are ready to discover it, we’ll be waiting.” Through the end of May, Whitecliff Vineyard is open Thursday through Monday, 11:30am-5:30pm; and Saturday, 11:30am-6pm. June through October, the tasting room is open Sundays through Fridays, 11:30am-5:30pm and 11am-6pm on Saturdays....

Tags: Craft Beverage Industry

7 Stellar Hudson Valley Diners

Lifelong diner enthusiasts Tom and Alecia Eberhardt-Smith dish on their seven favorite Hudson Valley diners.

Tags: General Food & Drink

Cocktail Recipe: Apple Car Named Desire

At Gardiner Liquid Mercantile, the Applecar Named Desire offers a pomme-forward brandy spin on the classic cognac Sidecar.

Tags: Recipes

Kapow! Vitality Bowls Brings Superfood Bowls & Smoothies to Dutchess County

Vitality Bowls, a superfood cafe franchise begun in San Ramon, California, has come to the Hudson Valley. The Wappingers Falls Vitality Bowls location, owned by Lesa and Mickey Bloom, serves made-to-order, antioxidant-rich smoothies, fresh juices, soups, salads, and paninis.

Tags: Restaurants

The Big List: Hudson Valley Food & Drink Festivals

As the season starts to warm up it's time to start planning your summer. Here is a list of 28 of the Hudson Valley's biggest and best food and drink festivals.

Tags: Culinary Events

Dutchess BBQ Brings the Mouthwatering Taste of the South to Poughkeepsie

Since opening in October 2018, Dutchess BBQ in Poughkeepsie has been delighting area residents with fall-off-the-bone, melt-in-your mouth Southern dishes like brisket, shrimp and grits, and pulled pork.

Tags: Restaurants

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