Where Slavery Died Hard | History | Hudson Valley | Hudson Valley; Chronogram
Pin It
Favorite

Where Slavery Died Hard 

sl_sojourner_truth-_2_.jpg

In the 1790s, Ulster County was one of the top four slave-holding counties in New York State. During that time, Sojourner Truth was born a slave named Isabella near Rosendale. She never learned to read or write. In 1826, she escaped with her infant daughter. In 1843, she changed her name, and vowed to travel and preach the truth, speaking against injustice. She traveled the country for over 40 years as a human rights advocate fighting for abolition, women's rights, and prison reform. Truth's personal writings inspired anthropological archaeologists Wendy Harris and Arnold Pickman to study historic maps, deeds, wills, contemporary narrative accounts, church records, and census manuscripts to uncover the significance of the presence of African-Americans in the development of the Hudson Valley during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The presentation and slideshow "Where Slavery Died Hard: The Forgotten History of Ulster County and the Shawangunk Region" will be held at the Cragsmoor Historical Society on Saturday, June 4, at 4pm.

Tags:

Pin It
Favorite

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

Hudson Valley Events

submit event
Color & Japanese Papermaking and Tatiana Ginsberg @ Women's Studio Workshop

Color & Japanese Papermaking and Tatiana Ginsberg

Mon., Aug. 21, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. — Through Aug. 25. Explore your fascination with Japanese paper and color in...
Visual Poetry with Laimah Osman @ Women's Studio Workshop

Visual Poetry with Laimah Osman

Mon., Aug. 21, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. — Through Aug. 25. Learn how to work visually with words. Break the...

View all of today's events

Latest in History

Related to History

More by Diana Waldron

Hudson Valley Tweets